Australasian longitudinal studies on child and adolescent obesity

Health of Young Victorians Study (HOYVS)

HOYVS logo

Formal study name:
Health of Young Victorians Study
Web link: http://www.rch.org.au/ccch/research.cfm?doc_id=10640
Number of waves: 3

HOYVS has studied obesity and health-related quality of life in school children in 1997, 2000 and 2005. The latest wave (HOYVS 2005) is providing information about how young people’s physical growth, health and well-being change between childhood and adolescence, and factors that may influence this.

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PEAS Kids Growth Study

PEAS logo

Formal study name:
PEAS Kids Growth Study
Web link: http://www.rch.org.au/ccch/research.cfm?doc_id=10664
Number of waves: 13

The PEAS Kids Growth Study has measured the growth of more than 300 children since birth. It is studying how different patterns of growth and body composition affect children’s chances of staying at a healthy weight. It’s also interested in early life predictors, such as parental weight status, social factors, pre- and postnatal smoking, nutrition and physical activity.

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The Nepean Study

Formal study name:
The Nepean Longitudinal Study
Number of waves: 5

The Nepean Longitudinal Study is a prospective study which has been designed to explore foetal and mid-childhood influences, including family and home environment, on body composition, including bone, and metabolic risk in a contemporary Australian adolescence.

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GADS

Formal study name:
Childhood Growth and Development Study
Number of waves: 7

Investigating the biological, psychological and social factors related to the development and persistence of childhood obesity.

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FLAME study

Formal study name:
FLAME study
Number of waves: 8

Focuses on family habits that might predict development of overweight at 7 years.

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Growing Up in Australia

Formal study name:
Longitudinal Study of Australian Children
Web link: http://www.aifs.gov.au/growingup/
Number of waves: 8

Growing Up in Australia is the biggest ongoing national study of children ever mounted in Australia – following 10,000 children recruited as babies and preschoolers in 2004. At every wave, children have been weighed and measured, and data collected on activity and nutrition patterns. It has already led to a number of publications on childhood obesity. Its wealth of data is available to all researchers – access instructions are on the study’s website.

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